Tag Archives: LRC resources

‘Dobble’ the fun!

The latest game available at the LRC is aimed at students learning German, though it could be applied to any language. There are a few different ways to play; instructions are given in both English and German, and a list of images and their German words are also provided.

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The basic concept is that any two cards has one and only one image that matches between them. Whoever points out the similarity between the cards will get a point. This game is great for students beginning to learn German who want to learn new vocabulary words, including remembering those pesky definite articles, and for those who want to get some practice speaking.

Dobble is similar to our other fantastic game Spot it!, which includes words as well as images and therefore has a different set of cards for each language.

Rory’s Story Cubes- New Game!

Proficiency in speaking and listening comprehension skills are important in learning a language-and passing your language finals.  The LRC has a new game that can help you practice these skills in any language you want.

The game consists of nine cubes, and each side of the cube has a different image, such as a bee, a fish, or a fountain.  In addition to the original, the LRC has two other versions, “Voyages” and “Actions” that have different images on the cubes.

There are a number of different ways to play, but each game type essentially consists of the same rules. Simply take all nine cubes provided and roll them. Then, starting with ‘Once upon a time….’ or whatever beginning you choose, select the image that catches your eye first. The objective is to tell a story that links together all nine images. Create an individual story or make it an improv game, with each player contributing part of the story.

Learning a Language has never been so Transparent!

Please forgive my terrible puns. But learning German (or any language!) can be fun and easy using the many resources offered free of cost by the LRC, and one of my favorite examples is an online program called Transparent Language.

I used this resource to review some forgotten German vocabulary as well as try some of the basic lessons in Mandarin. Any German language learner at any level-beginner, intermediate or advanced- can use this program, which has a wide range of lessons and topics to choose from. You can skip around if you want, which is great for advanced speakers who don’t want to go through all the beginner lessons. The best thing about Transparent Language is that it helps in every area of language learning: reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking!

You do not need to be on an LRC computer to use this resource, but you can always come in and use our headphones and microphones for this program. To get started, visit the LRC webpage at www.gettysburg.edu/lrc and click on Resources. Under Online Resources, Transparent Language will be the first option. You will be asked to create a profile and a login and then you’re ready to go! 

Scribblenauts auf Deutsch!

Have you ever played the video game Scribblenauts? Modeled in the style of a comic book, Scribblenauts is a fun puzzle based game in which you must come up with different nouns to solve problems the hero, Maxwell, encounters.

At the LRC you can play Scribblenauts in German on our iPads! This game is best suited for intermediate or advanced German students because it requires a variety of vocabulary knowledge that beginner students may not have yet. However, that shouldn’t stop you from trying it! This game is excellent for practicing word recall and vocabulary, and Autocorrect can help you out with spelling. To play, make sure the language of the IPad is set on German by going to the IPad’s General Settings > Language and Region > iPad language.

The German department and German club participated in a Game Night in the LRC earlier in the semester, and once we started playing, it was hard to stop! This game is very fun when you creatively solve problems. For example, to cut a tree down to receive a star from the top, we used the obvious saw and ax, then were able to use einer Flammenwerfer-a flamethrower! The breadth of objects available for use in Scribblenauts never fails to astound me. 

Keep in mind that for each scenario you will have to come up with three different ways to solve the problem; essentially three different nouns that the characters can use. Additionally, you cannot use words you have already used in past scenarios, so choose wisely and be creative!