Tag Archives: games

‘Dobble’ the fun!

The latest game available at the LRC is aimed at students learning German, though it could be applied to any language. There are a few different ways to play; instructions are given in both English and German, and a list of images and their German words are also provided.

asmodee-joc-de-carti-dobble-7747

The basic concept is that any two cards has one and only one image that matches between them. Whoever points out the similarity between the cards will get a point. This game is great for students beginning to learn German who want to learn new vocabulary words, including remembering those pesky definite articles, and for those who want to get some practice speaking.

Dobble is similar to our other fantastic game Spot it!, which includes words as well as images and therefore has a different set of cards for each language.

Rory’s Story Cubes- New Game!

Proficiency in speaking and listening comprehension skills are important in learning a language-and passing your language finals.  The LRC has a new game that can help you practice these skills in any language you want.

The game consists of nine cubes, and each side of the cube has a different image, such as a bee, a fish, or a fountain.  In addition to the original, the LRC has two other versions, “Voyages” and “Actions” that have different images on the cubes.

There are a number of different ways to play, but each game type essentially consists of the same rules. Simply take all nine cubes provided and roll them. Then, starting with ‘Once upon a time….’ or whatever beginning you choose, select the image that catches your eye first. The objective is to tell a story that links together all nine images. Create an individual story or make it an improv game, with each player contributing part of the story.

New Game in the LRC: Hit Manga!

Hit Manga is a multiplayer card game that can be played in both English and Japanese. Players are provided with 50 red cards (cards for taking), 50 gray cards (cards for reading), 4 yellow cards (negative points), and 4 blue cards (new rules that can be added). Before starting the game, all of the red cards are laid out on the table, a gray card for each player is set aside, and the rest of the gray cards are placed face down in the middle of the table as a stockpile. The directions specify that the “biggest Manga fan” takes his/her turn first. The first player up takes one gray card and imagines a situation for the scene on the card, describing where the person is, who the person is, what the person is doing, etc. He/she then acts out what the person on the card may be saying and doing, while the other players look at the red cards and try to determine which card the player is describing, taking a guess as soon as possible. When you think you have the correct card, show it to the first player. If the cards match, you both get one point, which you keep track of by keeping the cards. If your card doesn’t match, your chance is over and the other players take their guesses.

Be careful! Each player only has one guess per round! If no one finds the correct card, the player whose turn it is gets a yellow card, indicating that he/she has negative one point. The next player then picks up a gray card and tries to act it out and the game continues until the stockpile of gray cards runs out, or until all four yellow cards run out. The winner is the player with the most points. If there is a tie, the winner is determined by who has less yellow cards.

To change things up, players can use blue cards to add new rules to the game! These include communicating only through onomatopoeia, mimicry, and sound effects, communicating only with gestures, using your turn to build on the story of the previous player, and communicating using a rule you made up. The blue cards offer both an English and a Japanese explanation and the game comes with directions in both languages as well. Hit Manga can be an exciting way to strengthen your language by using it in situations you may not have before, or it can just be a fun game to play with friends!Hit Manga (1)

Scribblenauts auf Deutsch!

Have you ever played the video game Scribblenauts? Modeled in the style of a comic book, Scribblenauts is a fun puzzle based game in which you must come up with different nouns to solve problems the hero, Maxwell, encounters.

At the LRC you can play Scribblenauts in German on our iPads! This game is best suited for intermediate or advanced German students because it requires a variety of vocabulary knowledge that beginner students may not have yet. However, that shouldn’t stop you from trying it! This game is excellent for practicing word recall and vocabulary, and Autocorrect can help you out with spelling. To play, make sure the language of the IPad is set on German by going to the IPad’s General Settings > Language and Region > iPad language.

The German department and German club participated in a Game Night in the LRC earlier in the semester, and once we started playing, it was hard to stop! This game is very fun when you creatively solve problems. For example, to cut a tree down to receive a star from the top, we used the obvious saw and ax, then were able to use einer Flammenwerfer-a flamethrower! The breadth of objects available for use in Scribblenauts never fails to astound me. 

Keep in mind that for each scenario you will have to come up with three different ways to solve the problem; essentially three different nouns that the characters can use. Additionally, you cannot use words you have already used in past scenarios, so choose wisely and be creative!

Spot it! Basic Italian

Here at the Language Resource Center, we carry Spot it! for basic Italian. Spot it! is an educational game that features universal images and words. Between any two cards, there is always only one matching pair. These pairs can be two images, two words, or an image and a word. Players can compete to find the matching pair before their opponent or race against the clock, seeing how quickly they can spot the matches themselves. Spot it! is an awesome tool for beginner Italian speakers. The repetition of the words among the cards solidifies word recognition and the pictures support reading comprehension. Saying the words aloud improves speech and trying to find matches quickly strengthens processing speed. Spot it! makes learning basic Italian vocabulary fun and breaks away from tedious memorization techniques. Playing Spot it! will improve your vocabulary and boost your understanding of the words you’re learning in a way lists and index cards can’t!

Spot It! New LRC Game

Do you like fast-paced language learning games for you and up to 7 friends?

Then check out Spot It!, the newest game available in the LRC. Spot It! comes in Spanish, French, Italian, and German, and Chinese and Arabic versions of the game are currently being made by LRC employees.

There is one and only one similarity between every pair of cards. Be the first to spot the similarity between two cards, whether its the same symbol, the same word, or a word corresponding with a symbol, and you get the point! A guide showing the correct word-picture combinations are also available.

The words/items used are very common (i.e. cat, window, boat, car, etc.), making this a great game for beginners to learn different nouns or for more advanced students to review old vocabulary.

New Game at the LRC: Letter Dice

letter dice

Ever wanted to play scrabble, bananagrams, or boggle in another language? With Letter Dice, you can do all three! Shake up the 13 dice in their tin, roll them out and and see what words you can spell. The game includes three suggested variations, but feel free to come up with your own!

Letter Dice:

Set a time limit for each player, then throw the dice. Use the letters shown to create words and connect them like you would in scrabble or bananagrams. At the end of the time limit, total the numerical value of all the words played (letters used in more than one word count twice) and then subtract the value of the unused letters to get that player’s score. Then repeat the process for each player. Play as many rounds as you want!

Letter Yatzi:

Throw the dice and decide on a word to try to make with them. You don’t have to have all the letters available at first. Put the ones that help you aside and re-roll the rest. From the re-rolled, put aside those that help make your big word and re-roll those that don’t. If there are not helpful letters in the re-roll, you still have to put one aside. Repeat until all the letters have been used to make the word or put aside. If you can make a word using all 13 dice, your score for that word is doubled!

Vocabulary:

This one is a bit like Boggle. As a team, use the dice to make a single (preferably long) word. Then from the letters in that word, think of as many other words as you can. The person who comes up with the last word is the winner. You could also just use the dice to actually play Boggle in your second language. Roll the dice and arrange them in  a grid then play!

Since we have two tins of dice, you can have double the fun. Use more dice to make bigger words or accommodate common conjugations or plurals in your second language. You can also play any of these variations alone, play against yourself and see how much you can improve!