Category Archives: Resources

LRC Workshop – Digital Storytelling

Thank you to those who attended the second LRC faculty workshop of the fall.

In about 45 minutes, I explained what digital storytelling is and how and why you might want to use it in your classroom. We also had hands-on practice using two tools: VoiceThread and YouTube.

If you were unable to make it to the workshop, you can still access the materials, which are all linked from a Google Doc.

I’m looking forward to seeing you at the next workshop!

Betsy Lavolette

Betsy Lavolette is the director of the Gettysburg College Language Resource Center.

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LRC Workshop – CLEAR’s Audio Dropbox, Video Dropbox, and Conversations

Thank you to those who attended the first LRC faculty workshop of the fall.

In about 45 minutes, I covered three tools from the Center for Language Education and Research (CLEAR): Audio Dropbox, Video Dropbox, and Conversations. These tools are free, easily to embed in Moodle, and allow students to record audio or video directly in a web browser. For more about these tools, please check out the following article:
Rich Internet Applications: Overview, Audio Dropbox, Conversations

If you were unable to make it to the workshop, you can still access the materials:

I’m looking forward to seeing you at the next workshop!

Betsy Lavolette

Betsy Lavolette is the director of the Gettysburg College Language Resource Center.

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IZI.travel – Create an audio tour

URL: http://izi.travel/how-it-works

Description: Create an audio tour for spots of interest. The content will automatically be displayed (e.g., audio will automatically be played) when the user approaches the marked spot.

Cost: Free

Izi.travel

Application:

Your language students can use the web interface to create tours of, for example, your campus. They can include text, images, audio, and video, and they mark the location on a map. Then, the user downloads the free mobile app (for iPhone, Android, or Windows Phone) and searches for your tour. When he or she approaches an area where the students have included tour information, that information is automatically displayed, and the audio automatically begins playing!

In addition to the language practice your students get from creating the tour, the tours they create can be used, for example, by international visitors and students who would like to enjoy a campus audio tour in their first languages.

(Crossposted at the CeLTA Technology for Language Teaching blog)

Betsy Lavolette

Betsy Lavolette is the director of the Gettysburg College Language Resource Center.

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ThingLink and Thinglink Video

 Thinglink originally let you annotate an image with notes, video, audio, or links to other places. Here is an example, below, and you can read more about it in this post.

Original Thinglink:

Thinglink is pretty useful for presenting vocabulary, scaffolding speaking assignments, and mashing together media.  But it got even better!

Thinglink Video just started giving access to its newest tool: Thinglink video. Now, you can annotate videos with comments, links to webpages, images, other videos, and sound, connecting those annotations to a specific place in the video.  Wow!

Thinglink video:

This has so many great educational uses. You can find a YouTube clip in the target language and annotate it with cultural and linguistic notes. Students can record a presentational speaking assignment in YouTube, share the unlisted URL for it, and then a teacher can give feedback on it, tying their comments to specific times in the video, or giving them links to grammar references. You can have students create video projects and link to other related information. Teacher trainers can video-tape new teachers and then use the annotations to give the teachers feedback on specific things happening in the class.

Videos can be shared via a link or you can copy the embed code to put it into a blog, course management tool, etc.  It is extremely easy to use.  Great stuff!

Anne Baker

Anne is associate director at MSU's Center for Language Teaching Advancement, where Dr. Lavolette is dearly missed. Our loss and your gain, Gettysburg!

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New game available: Influent

Influent is an interesting new game for learning vocabulary. Check out the trailer:

Influent Launch Trailer from PlayInfluent on Vimeo.

The LRC has a copy of the game installed on a computer (the first one on the left when you walk in). Right now, we have only Japanese, but if you’d like to try it in a different language, just let a staff member know! We can also purchase copies for more computers if it gets popular.

The game is currently available in the following languages, with more coming soon:

  • Japanese
  • Mandarin Chinese
  • Spanish
  • English
  • French
  • Swedish
  • Bulgarian
  • German
  • Latin
  • Korean
  • Russian

Have you tried this game? What did you think of it?

Betsy Lavolette

Betsy Lavolette is the director of the Gettysburg College Language Resource Center.

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Aurasma – Augmented reality app

URL: http://www.aurasma.com/

Description: Augmented reality app that you can use to make static images come to life as videos in the target language

Cost: Free

Aurasma_logo

Application: Aurasma is an augmented reality app available for iPhone, iPad, and Android. There are many ways to use it, but one idea is to use images of proficient speakers of the target language as trigger images for videos of the same speakers talking. You can post these trigger images around the classroom, and students can move around the room (alone or in groups of two or more), using the app to trigger and watch the videos. They fill out a worksheet to ensure they are understanding the key information from each video.

An advantage to using Aurasma rather than showing the videos to the whole class is that the students can work independently and at their own pace. They can watch the videos as many times as necessary to fill out the worksheet. You can also offer personalized assistance to students who need it, and stay out of the way of students who don’t need it.

An advantage to using Aurasma rather than having the students view the videos on their own devices is that it gets them moving around the room. Do not underestimate the power of movement to re-energize your class! Students also find it amazing to see the static images come to life when using the app.

Here is an example worksheet for checking video comprehension. I used this with kids learning Japanese, but you could use this for any language, assuming you had/created the right videos. I used Video Dropbox to collect videos from target-language speakers around the world.

Aurasma Studio is the web interface for Aurasma that you use to upload the videos and images you use, then create the “Auras” that allow you to trigger the videos using the images.

[Cross-posted here.]

Betsy Lavolette

Betsy Lavolette is the director of the Gettysburg College Language Resource Center.

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