ThingLink and Thinglink Video

 Thinglink originally let you annotate an image with notes, video, audio, or links to other places. Here is an example, below, and you can read more about it in this post.

Original Thinglink:

Thinglink is pretty useful for presenting vocabulary, scaffolding speaking assignments, and mashing together media.  But it got even better!

Thinglink Video just started giving access to its newest tool: Thinglink video. Now, you can annotate videos with comments, links to webpages, images, other videos, and sound, connecting those annotations to a specific place in the video.  Wow!

Thinglink video:

This has so many great educational uses. You can find a YouTube clip in the target language and annotate it with cultural and linguistic notes. Students can record a presentational speaking assignment in YouTube, share the unlisted URL for it, and then a teacher can give feedback on it, tying their comments to specific times in the video, or giving them links to grammar references. You can have students create video projects and link to other related information. Teacher trainers can video-tape new teachers and then use the annotations to give the teachers feedback on specific things happening in the class.

Videos can be shared via a link or you can copy the embed code to put it into a blog, course management tool, etc.  It is extremely easy to use.  Great stuff!

Anne Baker

Anne is associate director at MSU's Center for Language Teaching Advancement, where Dr. Lavolette is dearly missed. Our loss and your gain, Gettysburg!

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About Anne Baker

Anne is associate director at MSU's Center for Language Teaching Advancement, where Dr. Lavolette is dearly missed. Our loss and your gain, Gettysburg!

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